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Discussion in 'Fish Diseases & Treatments' started by graeme01, Nov 5, 2018.

  1. graeme01

    graeme01 New Member

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    Hi this is my 1st post to this forum,ive got a question on quarantine tanks,after the last fish has left the qt is it better to strip it bk down or clean it thoroughly b4 adding another fish,can it go fallow ??thanks for any responses

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  2. nanoreefing4fun

    nanoreefing4fun Well-Known Member
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    :rbwwelc:to RS ! Hopefully some one can advise...
     
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  3. saintsreturn

    saintsreturn Well-Known Member

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    Welcome to the site and what a way to start out your first post!

    For me, i break it down each time and "clean it up." I do this for a couple reasons:

    1) I dont introduce fish very often.
    2) Dont want to dedicate full time space
    3) Dont need to spend the money (however small it may be) to have it run with nothing in it
    4) I dont want to deal with it (water top offs, checking levels before using again, etc)

    I find it easier to break it down and just pull water from my tank each time i start it back up. Out of sight, out of mind.

    That said, if you dont care about the above, you can keep it fallow, but you will most likely need to top it off and check to make sure you dont have any negative growth or nutrient build ups as it sits around doing nothing. Remember, you will still have bacteria and waste in the system doing their thing in between uses.
     
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  4. graeme01

    graeme01 New Member

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    Thanks for the reply,im restocking my dt after having a wipeout from velvet so the qt will be up an running till im restocked

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  5. Pancho75

    Pancho75 Well-Known Member

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    Welcome to RS!!! Good to have you here.


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  6. Pat24601

    Pat24601 Well-Known Member

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    When I was adding fish fairly frequently, I basically had a fully cycled tank I would keep fallow, but keep an ammonia source in to keep the cycle up.

    I tended to call it more of an "observation tank" than a QT tank. Any new fish would stay in it for about 6 weeks before I put in the DT.

    I think that's an unusual thing to do, but it's also not an uncommon practice among the saltwater folks in my circles, at least.

    I liked it because I think having a fully cycled tank is a healthier place to watch new fish before they go in the DT.

    But, it is definitely more maintenance. Not that much more because a fallow tank isn't too hard to take care of, but more.
     
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  7. graeme01

    graeme01 New Member

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    Thank for taking time out to read my post,apart from.lfs nobody to run my thoughts past

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  8. graeme01

    graeme01 New Member

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    Yeh im thinking the same thing,less stress for the fish going into a cycled tank,do u just observe the fish or do u treat regardless

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  9. nanoreefing4fun

    nanoreefing4fun Well-Known Member
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    Start a tank thread and share some pics, we Love pics and following along ! :cheers:
     
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  10. graeme01

    graeme01 New Member

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    Ill photo the tank 2mrw and post pics,thanks

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  11. graeme01

    graeme01 New Member

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    Hi does anyone no how long to fallow a tank after mv and has been treated with copper ???

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  12. Uncle99

    Uncle99 Well-Known Member

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    Unless you fully clean the tank, copper will be present.
    Even after your clean it some trace copper may still be in the seams.
    This should not be a problem for fish, but a big potential problem for corals or inverts. Once a tank become a HT, safer to keep as HT.

    Wash with vinegar, rinse, again, rinse, and let dry a min of 48 hours.

    Once copper used, everything alive is dead, except for the fish....I hope...
     
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  13. graeme01

    graeme01 New Member

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    Thanks for the reply uncle99,i should of said its my qt that i was asking about,was wondering how long b4 i can put another fish in it after its been treated

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  14. nanoreefing4fun

    nanoreefing4fun Well-Known Member
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    This may help... extract from one of Lee's post

    I am asked many times how to clean a tank after a disease or treatment. I should put it all into one post so I can just point to it, rather than repeating myself. So this is the post! At the end of this post I've put the cleaning procedure for all NEW equipment and decorations. Any to-be-saltwater-wet item needs to be properly cleaned prior to use in the marine aquarium.

    CLEAN UP

    Routine QT Clean Up -- Healthy Fish

    After a QT use where the fish turned out healthy, the clean up really doesn't have to be that extensive. In fact, if the fish turned out to be totally healthy before it went to the display, the QT isn't contaminated. A simple tap water rinse of the tank and equipment followed by multiple RO/DI or distilled water rinses is good enough (or not needed at all if the QT will be kept up and running). The bio filter can be returned to the display system to keep it active/alive.


    QT Clean Up After Medication Was Used
    If a fish was successfully treated in the QT, then the QT is free of the disease, right? This clean up procedure is only used when there is no disease in the QT.

    Toss the bio filter and put a new one in the display system. Or, if you were ahead of yourself and you had to begin the use of medication in the QT, then you put a new QT bio filter into the display to get it ready.

    Most medications are water soluble and don't attach themselves to the surfaces of a 'normal' QT. If there is more things in the QT that aren't plastic or glass, then there may be remnants of medication. Assuming no copper medications (see below) were used, this is a fine process to use to clean the QT:
    1. Rinse in tap water
    2. Wash with vinegar, diluted about 1:10 in tap water
    3. Rinse a few times with fresh tap water
    4. Rinse a few times with RO/DI or distilled water
    5. Let aquarium/equipment go bone dry.


    QT Clean Up With Disease
    If the QT was used and the fish died during the cure or treatment, there is a very real chance that the disease is present in the QT. In this situation, the QT must be cleaned before its next use. So this situation is a disease in the QT, but no copper was used.

    It is best to dispose of as much equipment as you can. The original setup for the QT is so inexpensive, and I have recommended that no sophisticated equipment be used (see: A Quarantine Procedure) so its loss should not be a financial burden. For sure, dispose of the bio filter. However, for the tank itself, nets and some equipment that can handle the chemicals:
    1. As above
    2. As above
    3. As above
    4. Wash with bleach, diluted about 1:10 of household bleach
    5. Rinse several times in fresh tap water
    6. Rinse a few times with RO/DI or distilled water
    7. Let aquarium/equipment go bone dry.


    QT/Hospital Tank Clean Up With Copper
    About the most frequently used medication that presents a cleaning problem to the aquarist is the use of copper to treat a disease. Copper will attach itself to plastics and glass. Even though the copper is so little that it can't be detected by a regular copper test kit, it is in high enough concentration to kill invertebrates that the aquarist may attempt to quarantine. Thus a quarantine tank turns into a hospital tank for copper treatments. The hospital tank can't be used for a QT for invertebrates, until it has been cleaned enough to remove the copper 'stuck' in the system.

    If the copper treatment was successful and the fish is disease-free AND the tank will only be used to quarantine fish, then like the first case, there is no need to do any cleaning. The bio filter should be kept in the hospital tank or replaced, but NOT returned to the display tank.

    If the hospital tank needs to be copper-free then there is a complex cleaning process to follow. However after experiments with snails, crabs, and Xenia, the following cleaning is good enough to put the copper in low enough concentration in the water to support these marine lifeforms. The bio filter must be thrown away. Toss away equipment including tubing, and anything that can't handle the cleaning process or is too difficult to make sure is properly cleaned.

    1. A few hot tap water rinses (as hot as can be stood by the tank/equipment, and aquarist!)
    2. Let tank/equipment cool off
    3. Wash with Vinegar; 1:10 dilution of household/salad vinegar
    4. Several tap water rinses
    5. Wash with a mild liquid soap solution
    6. Several tap water rinses
    7. Wash with bleach; 1:10 dilution of household bleach
    8. Several tap water rinses
    9. Several RO/DI or distilled water rinses
    10. Let go bone dry for a few days before use

    New Equipment Cleaning
    I always clean new equipment. Manufacturers often (unintentionally) leave chemical residues on and in equipment. I circulate pumps with different kinds of water before installing them. I similarly clean out filters and filter pumps, skimmers, tubing, all canisters (holding mechanical and/or chemical filter materials), etc., etc. I also clean out NEW aquariums like this, too. This cleaning process goes like this:
    1. Rinse in tap water several times;
    2. Wash/rinse/run pumps and equipment with soapy water (1 Tablespoonful of unscented mild liquid soap (e.g., Ivory liquid hand soap) in a gallon of water [if you have a sump and a more elaborate system, this rinsing is VERY important to run the equipment through with the soapy water -- especially through all pipes/plumbing];
    3. Rinse in tap water at least 5 times (using fresh tap water each time);
    4. Rinse in RO/DI water at least twice; and
    5. Rinse in used or spent (or if none is available - new) saltwater twice, using new water for each rinse.
    (NOTE: When I'm cleaning out a new tank or sump, the 'rinses' are wiping down the inside walls with the indicated liquids. I don't 'fill up' the entire container, but I wipe it all down.)

    If you buy and use artificial decorations, I suggest not only cleaning them, but letting them soak one week in DI water, then another one week in salt water. These things often leach organics into the water over time. The initial two weeks is usually good enough to get most of what they'll leach fast. This cleaning will follow 1. to 4. in this section above, plus the soaks.


    Hope this helps and is clear. If you have any questions, please post.

    __________________
    LEE
     
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  15. graeme01

    graeme01 New Member

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    Big thanks nanoreefing4fun that was evrything i needed to know

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  16. graeme01

    graeme01 New Member

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    Heres another question,what about a fish dying in qt were copper was used??

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  17. graeme01

    graeme01 New Member

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    It was velvet it died from but was just to far gone to survive

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