Freshwater fish in saltwater tank?

Discussion in 'New Frontiers' started by Sharkbait, Oct 13, 2005.

  1. Sharkbait

    Sharkbait New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2005
    Messages:
    438
    Likes Received:
    57
    Location:
    Phoenix
    I saw a Mollie in a huge saltwater tank, and it made me start thinking.I'm curious about acclimation of freshies to saltwater.I want to know what fish can be switched. I know mollies can, what else? Does anyone know the procedure?
     
    #1
  2. Woodstock

    Woodstock The Wand Geek was here. ;)
    RS STAFF

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2003
    Messages:
    26,962
    Likes Received:
    1,421
    Location:
    North Carolina
    It seems like any brackish fish could be acclimated to full salinity... not sure though. Good question~

    If I ever set up a pony tank, I plan on having a black mollie tank just to help feed them.
     
    #2
  3. BoomerD

    BoomerD New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2003
    Messages:
    5,635
    Likes Received:
    248
    Location:
    Northern California
    Mollies aren't actually freshwater fish, but rather brackish water. They can be acclimated quite nicely to saltwater, but of course, since this is not their natural habitat, they don't usually live as long. Many people use the s/w acclimated ones as feeder fish. Supposedly they are more nutritious than goldfish for the salt water predators.
     
    #3
  4. mps9506

    mps9506 New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2004
    Messages:
    8,576
    Likes Received:
    279
    Location:
    Wilmington, NC / Newark, DE
    Ditto.

    Other brackish fish sometimes seen in the FW hobby include "FW puffers", monos, scats, flounder, various gobies.
    Some types of killies, and other topminnows can be acclimated to full salt.

    FWIW, sailfin mollies are pretty common in the salt marshes on the east coast.
     
    #4
    Paul B likes this.
  5. Witfull

    Witfull Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2003
    Messages:
    19,162
    Likes Received:
    807
    Location:
    South Jersey
    ive also acclimated swordfish to salt water, only the wild scpecies really do it well,,,the hybrids dont fair as well.
     
    #5
  6. fishhead

    fishhead Active Member

    Joined:
    May 4, 2005
    Messages:
    692
    Likes Received:
    31
    Location:
    Vancouver, WA
    Puffers
     
    #6
  7. fishhead

    fishhead Active Member

    Joined:
    May 4, 2005
    Messages:
    692
    Likes Received:
    31
    Location:
    Vancouver, WA
    Where's all the saltwater frogs?
     
    #7
  8. Witfull

    Witfull Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2003
    Messages:
    19,162
    Likes Received:
    807
    Location:
    South Jersey
    bevis and butthead took them,,,lol
     
    #8
  9. Sharkbait

    Sharkbait New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2005
    Messages:
    438
    Likes Received:
    57
    Location:
    Phoenix
    Thanks for the replies, much appreciated to all.How slow should this acclimation be?
     
    #9
  10. Cougra

    Cougra New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2003
    Messages:
    2,221
    Likes Received:
    200
    Location:
    Toronto, ON
    Mollies have an amazing ability to adapt. I have seen people put them from a freshwater tank right into a fully saltwater tank and live, however I think it would be best slowly to raise the salinity over the course of a week or two. If the Mollies have been kept in a system that has a bit of salt added all the time then they can be acclimatized faster then one that has been kept in a completely salt free tank.

    Not all freshwater fish can be adapted to saltwater conditions. There are primary and secondary freshwater fish. Primary freshwater fish have evolved in freshwater and as such can not handle high levels of salts in the water for long periods of time.
    Secondary freshwater fish are fish that started off in the oceans and slowly moved inland. These fish tend to do better with a bit of salt in the water but still can't really adapt to full salwater conditions.
    Then there are brackish water fish that can adapt to full saltwater and full freshwater conditions but still tend to do better somewhere between the two extremes. (This is where mollies fit in.)
     
    #10
  11. Witfull

    Witfull Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2003
    Messages:
    19,162
    Likes Received:
    807
    Location:
    South Jersey
    feeder guppies are lil toughies too...drop em in and a week later you see one or two hidimg for their lives but no problems with the water.
     
    #11
  12. Little Luey

    Little Luey New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2004
    Messages:
    432
    Likes Received:
    33
    Location:
    Yuma, Arizona
    I used a molly to get ammonia in to my 20gal for 3 weeks. I used the old floating the bag acclimatation, but it was a lot slower, it probably took me 3 hours to release him in the tank. This was probably over kill but i wanted to go slow. After 3 weeks he developed kind of like an air bubble on his head and I had to sacrifice him. I always wanted to try swiching a fish like this. It is also a lot less expensive since the mollie was $1.50 compared to a $10 damsel.
     
    #12
  13. gqjeff

    gqjeff New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2005
    Messages:
    51
    Likes Received:
    3
    I have always heard any live bearing freshwater fish can be acclimated over time to salt.. Not 100% sure if this is true but many fish you mentioned are live bearer's SP?

    Jeff
     
    #13
  14. Cougra

    Cougra New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2003
    Messages:
    2,221
    Likes Received:
    200
    Location:
    Toronto, ON
    No not all livebearers can be acclimatised to saltwater. In fact only mollies are really suited to being in brackish water conditions. In the wild swordtails don't come into contact with any sort of saltwater although they are secondary freshwater.
     
    #14
  15. jmanrow

    jmanrow New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2005
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Tigard, Oregon
    Guppies, will adapt to full strength seawater, but will not reproduce in it.
    As far as adapting mollies(which breed in any salinity!) and flounder to saltwater, replacing freshwater with saltwater as a 50/50 mix adapts them without any ill effects in two days.
    This also prevents a possible pH shock.
     
    #15
  16. Stevenmi

    Stevenmi New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2006
    Messages:
    218
    Likes Received:
    30
    Location:
    Westland Michigan
    Not really fresh water(brackish normally)...but I have kept mono's (Monodactylus argentus) in a reef.

    Steve
     
    #16
  17. reefjitsu

    reefjitsu Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2004
    Messages:
    761
    Likes Received:
    70
    Location:
    The Magic City
    Most of the common livebearers in the FW trade can live in fresh for a while (as Witt said, natural forms do better than captive breeds). As for mollies, Black mollies do best in water with a little salt but not quite brackish. As for Sailfin mollies, they seem to do alright in any water. I catch them from salt marshes in full strength sea water down on the Gulf. You can keep and breed them in saltwater, thus making them the best choice for live feeders that you can raise yourself. FW fish that have been acclimated to salt are not as good. The fish needs to be raised in SW and eating marine foods in order to achieve maximum nutrition for our marine fish.

    Scats and monos are probably the best bet for a "FW" fish that can be kept in a reef. I have been seeing alot of "FW" puffers kept in reefs lately (curiously after an online mag featured a pic with one). This is ok for some species for awhile, but most will not live their full lifespans like that. Also, beware that some puffers are entirely FW and will die if you try this, so do your research. There are actualyl quite alot of fish that can make these transitions, but they are not commonly available in the trade.

    http://www.reefsanctuary.com/forums/general-reef-aquarium-discussion/10008-saltwater-frogs.html
     
    #17
  18. AshSwerve

    AshSwerve New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2019
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    USA
    That is false about guppies, they will adapt and they DO reproduce in it. Many people including me sump them, and they reproduce creating more food for the tank. I also have 10 in a 10gal full reef system and I have watched them give birth.
     
    #18
Loading...
Similar Threads Forum Date
Saltwater Fish = Freshwater Treatment General Reef Aquarium Discussion Apr 14, 2017
Saltwater/Freshwater Aquarium/Fish Tank 30" Light 10K/Actinic 130watt Drygoods For Sale/Trade Oct 21, 2010
Freshwater Fish for SALE!-selling to get SW TANK Livestock for sale/trade Sep 29, 2009
freshwater fish for sale Livestock for sale/trade Dec 7, 2008
Freshwater Jellyfish Fresh Water Forum Nov 3, 2008

Share This Page