Florida may ban import of live lionfish

Discussion in 'Coral Reef & General "Aquaria" News' started by Oxylebius, Apr 19, 2014.

  1. Oxylebius

    Oxylebius Well-Known Member

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    Florida may ban import of live lionfish - article here.

    I have been hearing about this for a while now....just waiting to see where they take it.
     
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  2. Mike Johnson

    Mike Johnson Well-Known Member

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    There are plenty to be caught in Florida waters without having to import them. We need to export them instead. Might help with the epidemic.
     
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  3. Newjack

    Newjack New Member

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    that's crazy! Banning import of lion fish so people will capture them locally. Even starting tournaments. What will they think of next?

    The only thing I don't like about this is. If they do these things, Other more fragile marine life could get hurt in the process. I am not saying they shouldn't do it but maybe set other regulations to protect other species.

    You cant tell me if your hunting for your own lion fish in florida and you see a rare piece of coral that your not going to frag it.
     
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  4. Oxylebius

    Oxylebius Well-Known Member

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    Animated timeline map of lionfish invasion here. They really start to take off about 2000 (date on top left).
     
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  5. ReefApprentice

    ReefApprentice Well-Known Member

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    They already have tournaments for the largest/heaviest lionfish caught on line or speared, along with the most caught in like 48 hours. But I do think its about time...last week my LFS was selling "locally caught" lionfish for $75.
     
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  6. DaveK

    DaveK Well-Known Member

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    Considering that lionfish have already established a breeding population in Florida, around the Gulf of Mexico, up the Atlantic coast, and into the caribbean Sea, it's too late for a ban to have any effect. The lionfish is here to stay.

    Live many other proposed laws, this is done more for political grandstanding, rather than actually trying to solve the problem.
     
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  7. Newjack

    Newjack New Member

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    Im not one to argue but I think its more of a way to mellow the population. Before people in flordia got there livestock from diving in local waters. Now its much easier and cheaper to just go to LFS for many things. Considering the cost of air, gas to get to the dock then gas for boat, equipment and so forth. With a ban from imports, LFS and private divers will get them themselves. Not ridding of the population but keeping it under control.

    I still don't like the idea of everyone raiding any waters without regulations on what you can collect that should be strictly enforced. Like I said. If you see a pretty coral your gonna take some of the beauty. For all you know its the last one in existence or something else more rare relies on it for shelter or food.
     
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  8. Oxylebius

    Oxylebius Well-Known Member

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    Florida has very stick regulations on what you can and can't collect - these regulations are not new.

    Florida is also looking into banning other invasive vertebrates that have caused havoc on their ecosystems (e.g. snakes/everglades).

    Lionfish invasion: The lionfish devastates reefs by devouring young of the year and juvenile fish: this includes sport/recreational and commercial fish, which in turn play havoc with management of the resource and the economy. In Caribbean waters the lionfish doesn't have natural predators to keep the numbers in check. And b/c they broadcast spawn their larvae have been taken in the current though out the entire region.

    BTW - had lionfish for the first time on Bonaire, mighty tasty fish - light and flaky.
     
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  9. Mike Johnson

    Mike Johnson Well-Known Member

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    Wow, that's twice that you inferred that a collector would "frag something". Have you ever collected sea life in Florida? There's an army of enforcers; some with telescopes, watching your every move. Then there's the landing report. I have a commercial fishing license in Florida and I'm going to tell you that I wouldn't break the law.
     
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  10. Newjack

    Newjack New Member

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    yes ive been diving in FL no I have not collected sea life in FL, im from FL and ive seen people collect something in FL... They don't really pay attention to private dives.
     
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  11. Oxylebius

    Oxylebius Well-Known Member

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    Did you read the link I provided on recreational harvest - these regulations are not new. Florida updates their list annually to stay on top of recent declines/etc. of species. It is pretty comprehensive and allows for harvest as long as their regulations are being met (e.g. license, required gear, etc.). So, harvesting lionfish isn't going to change what people take or behavior. Therefore, I really don't understand your argument. There are also commercial rules (link on side of page).

    This doesn't apply in the Sanctuary. The Fl Keys National Marine Sanctuary is zoned with different level of protections, so you need to know what you can do where. I wouldn't collect in the Sanctuary, Sanctuary-wide restrictions. It is double the enforcement there.

    Having tournaments helps bring the number of lionfish in an area down in numbers. No, it won't eradicate the fish. I'm afraid they are here to stay. That is why we are trying to control the numbers in other ways. They may just end up being like nutria, which has spread and pretty much invaded the entire country now. Since lionfish don't have natural predators to keep their numbers in check, we have to figure out ways to do so. Why, you may ask, so we can protect our native species, both those we enjoy recreationally and commercially.
     
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  12. Oxylebius

    Oxylebius Well-Known Member

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  13. Mike Johnson

    Mike Johnson Well-Known Member

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    "You cant tell me if your hunting for your own lion fish in florida and you see a rare piece of coral that your not going to frag it."

    "I still don't like the idea of everyone raiding any waters without regulations on what you can collect that should be strictly enforced. Like I said. If you see a pretty coral your gonna take some of the beauty."

    Yes, I will tell you that I'm not going to frag it. There is no way that I'm going to break the law - the penalties when caught are not worth the risk. I've been a commercial fisherman for almost 30 years. (Just part time now).

    Careful, Oxylebius, you'll get a rude reputation comment.

    (I don't see how my post was rude in any way.)
     
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  14. Oxylebius

    Oxylebius Well-Known Member

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    My comment wasn't directed at you Mike. And the quotes that you point out aren't my quotes either.
     
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  15. Oxylebius

    Oxylebius Well-Known Member

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    :threadjack:

    Getting back to DaveK's comment - I agree banning lionfish now probably won't make a difference, they are here to stay in my opinion as well.

    States banning import of animals isn't new. Many states (e.g. Oregon) have bans in place on a wide-range of animals. These animals can't be imported or sold in stores. The reason behind it is if the animal gets loose or is intentionally released the animal can survive and populate potentially becoming a new invasive species. These regulations are put in place before there is an issue. Because after the fact may be useless as we are seeing with lionfish.
     
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